Winter 2016 Knitting Workshops

The Varnum will host a series of knitting workshops to help the beginner get started and the more experienced knitter improve on their craft!

February 8, 2016, 5-7pm: An introduction, or refresher, for some knit and purl basics. Together, we will each make a dishcloth and practice some fundamental stitches.

February 15, 2016, 5-7pm: Knitting in the round: different ways of casting on (cable stitch, crochet-on, long tail and short tail cast on) and increasing stitches (M1, ktb, k1r, etc). Together, we will each make a cowl (or scarf) using these techniques projects.

February 22, 2016, 5-7pm: Experimenting with colorwork and two stranded knitting; different ways to create decreases; different ways to cast off. We will incorporate some of these into the cowl or dishcloth projects.

February 29, 2016, 5-7pm: Slowly understanding cables: decorative finishes and edges; how to easily access resources for more. We will incorporate some of these techniques into our current project and complete cowl and/or dishcloth.

March 7, 2016, 5-7pm: Hats 101: Ready for more? Learn about decorative cast ons and find a simple hat pattern to try out your new skills! We will browse patterns together to find one that works for you.

March 14, 2016, 5-7pm: How about mittens and gloves, maybe fingerless? We will find a pattern based on your preference and get started! Also, learn about selecting cuffs and considering ribbing options, sourcing Norwegian and Latvian patterns, and more.

March 21, 2016, 5-7pm: Social open knit studio. Come and work on unfinished projects and learn a bit about some knitting history highlights and other trivia about knitting. We will have cookies, and welcome potluck contributions!

March 28, 2016, 5-7pm: Another social open knit studio, where we will talk about the future of knitting; great resources to know about; a few SOS strategies, as well as discuss health benefits of knitting that seem to be all the buzz!

Cookies again and potluck contributions are welcome! Bring unfinished projects and questions or roadblock challenges and we will work through them together!

 

Reading Frederick Douglass

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    On July 5, 1852 (before the Civil War) Frederick Douglass, a former slave and leading abolitionist, stunned his hosts in Rochester, New York, at an event commemorating Independence Day: "Fellow citizens, why am I called upon to speak here today? What have I, or those I represent, to do with  your  national independence? Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak today? What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July?"    Certainly not freedom in 1852.        
  
 
  
    
  
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              Thursday, July 2 at 7:00 p.m.             Cambridge Historical Society’s Warner Lodge       49 School St., Jeffersonville, VT           Varnum Memorial Library and Cambridge Historical Society invite Lamoille Residents to read Frederick Douglass’ fiery speech together.       Community members are invited to read a paragraph in the communal reading.    Please contact Donna Rooney at    auntdonnaroo@gmail.com    or call (802)730-4655 to confirm a reading segment.               Discussion will follow led by Bob Walsh, author of  The Other America: the African American Experience;  and  Through White Eyes: Color and Racism in Vermont  and Hal Colston, Vermont’s Man of the Year.     Presented by the Varnum Memorial Library and the Cambridge Historical Society.    For more information, visit    www.thevarnum.org      or call (802)644-2117.

On July 5, 1852 (before the Civil War) Frederick Douglass, a former slave and leading abolitionist, stunned his hosts in Rochester, New York, at an event commemorating Independence Day: "Fellow citizens, why am I called upon to speak here today? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak today? What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July?"  Certainly not freedom in 1852.

 

         Thursday, July 2 at 7:00 p.m.

 

Cambridge Historical Society’s Warner Lodge

49 School St., Jeffersonville, VT

 

Varnum Memorial Library and Cambridge Historical Society invite Lamoille Residents to read Frederick Douglass’ fiery speech together.  Community members are invited to read a paragraph in the communal reading.  Please contact Donna Rooney at auntdonnaroo@gmail.com or call (802)730-4655 to confirm a reading segment. 

 

Discussion will follow led by Bob Walsh, author of The Other America: the African American Experience; and Through White Eyes: Color and Racism in Vermont and Hal Colston, Vermont’s Man of the Year.

Presented by the Varnum Memorial Library and the Cambridge Historical Society.

For more information, visit www.thevarnum.org or call (802)644-2117.